Biotechnology Careers

Biotechnology Careers  - Biotechnology Jobs

If you’re seeking biotechnology careers, one thing is for certain ... the more education you have, the higher up you can go. The fact is, no matter where you wind up working, you will be surrounded by people with Ph.D.'s and medical degrees. It is highly unlikely that an individual without an advanced degree such as these will get to the top of the corporate chain.

Taking up a job in biotechnology means involving oneself in the development of new products and processes for the good of mankind and quality of life. Before one seriously considers a career in biotechnology, it is imperative to have extensive knowledge in biology, chemistry, and other life sciences.

Biotechnology has been around for centuries. From farming to food production and storage, biotechnology has touched our lives in numerous helpful ways.

As baby boomers age, there has been an increased demand for new medical procedures and equipment. As a result, biomedical engineering, a field that combines medicine with engineering and biology, is expected to grow in the next decade and beyond.

With an insight into both medical and engineering fields, biomedical engineers work effectively in hospitals, research facilities, academia, government regulatory agencies or as consultants.

Biotechnology companies need managers who can supervise the working of the company such as Research and Development, Production, and Quality Control. These people are often Ph.D. level scientists who have worked their way up through special achievements or accomplishments. They may also have business training and experience sometimes.

Biomechanics, which applies biomechanical engineering to biological or medical problems, utilizes scientific principles to produce new ways of keeping the body functional and healthy. These include the creation of synthetic organs and joints, as well as machines that control body functions, imaging systems like X-ray and ultrasound, and the laser systems used in corrective eye surgery.

As a result of these advances, the medical community has a better understanding of how certain organs and musculoskeletal systems function.

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, biomedical engineering is expected to grow faster than the average for all occupations through 2014. While a bachelor's in engineering is required, a graduate degree in engineering is also recommended for most entry-level bioengineering jobs. Many universities offer accredited engineering graduate programs.

Since all biotechnology companies, especially agricultural and pharmaceutical, are regulated by federal and state agencies such as FDA, EPA, and USDA regarding the safety, ethics etc of manufacturing and products, they need a team of experts and specialists to make sure the company follows all regulations laid down by these agencies.

Professional organizations, such as the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), can help students interested in pursuing biotechnology careers.

ASME promotes the interests of its members and keeps them informed of industry developments. Additionally, networking opportunities offered by the organization can help students find jobs and get on the right career track.